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Far from becoming obsolete, the decorative effects have more than ever the wind in their sails. All the more so are the "old-fashioned" structured coatings, which set the tone by returning to the authentic materials of the decorations of the past.

Decorative plasters: the effects of matter

Reliefs or smooth

The effects of traditional appearance are proposed in two variants: the "reliefs" effects of materials to be classified in the family of coatings, and the "smooth", closer to the paintings and glazes. To decorate this piece, we chose a tinted plaster in the mass (Lutece Décoplâtre "straw" by BPB Placo). It is intentionally applied in a "rough" way, to compose reliefs and irregularities of matter. A finishing wax softens its appearance by playing with light sources.
Presented as a "kit", this patina consists of three different products. The primary primer (Lutece Prim, 60.97 € about the bucket of 10 liters, 30 to 200 cm3 by m2) allows the plaster to adhere to the support. It is particularly recommended on porous and absorbent surfaces: plaster or plaster for example. Tinted in the mass, the plaster (Lutece Décoplâtre, 15.24 € about the 25 kg bag, 8.5 to 15 kg per m2) is the actual decorative coating. Applied in thick (about 5 to 10 mm), it is used on a medium preserved in a medium state, without obligation of a heavy preparation. It is available in twelve shades and contains grains of river sand that give it its particular structure. A version devoid of sand gives a smoother appearance. Finally, the finishing wax (Lutèce Décocire 190.56 € the can of 4 l, 300 g per m2 maxi) brings a warm touch to the decor, while protecting its surface.

The preparation of the support

The thickness of the decorative coating makes it possible to reduce to a minimum the leveling of the irregularities and the filling of the holes. It is important to treat "live" cracks with a calico-coated coating and to cover the larger cracks. This, above all, to limit the consumption of coating, even if this component is the least expensive of the "kit".
If the surface preparation is fairly basic, it is not the same for the attachment that must be particularly neat. The high weight of the coating requires a perfect support. Otherwise, it may come off in plates. Blocked bottoms or lacquers are frosted with medium grain, the porous or mealy bottom is treated with a primer. Previously diluted with water (1/3 of a liter of product for 2/3 of a liter of water), it is applied to the medium-bristle roller or, better still, with a pressurized garden sprayer. It is recoverable after twelve hours of drying.

Plaster mixing

When buying large quantities, to ensure consistency of colors, check that the plaster bags are all from the same manufacture by checking their serial number. In a large plastic bin or bucket, depending on the surface to be covered, pour the amount of clear water recommended on the leaflet: 14 liters of water for an entire 25 kg bag. Using an agitator mounted on a powerful drill, create a vortex in the water, then gently pour the powder. Stir until a smooth and homogeneous paste is obtained. If you have prepared a large amount of coating, do not panic, you have at least 2 hours 30 to apply it!

The effects of matter in practice

The laying principle depends on the desired end effect. Here, the plaster is applied by small touches with a large trowel, to give a "jerky" effect. It is important to press the tool firmly to adhere the coating to the substrate and to lay down a minimum thickness of 5 mm (up to 10 mm). With each square meter covered, the surface is leveled with the flat of the truellel slightly inclined. With great movements, always in the same direction, to create ridged and decorative circles.
For a more even effect, you can also apply it directly to the trowel or metal trowel. Place on the tool a homogeneous layer of plaster, and drop it on the wall by pressing moderately to spread it with a constant thickness. You can also try out less academic modes of application: rolling sheep or honeycomb, zipline, projection, or even with both hands, etc.
All structural effects are allowed. Here, we have roughly smoothed the plaster with the trowel as the application. It is floated a good two hours later to cut the reliefs and make the appearance a little uniform, while leaving irregularities: checks, hollows, etc. But the surface can also be whipped (with a bundle of brooms for example), rolled with a cloth, brushed, brushed, or smoothed with a stainless steel plate.

The waxed finish

Wait at least eight days before finishing. For simplicity, count twenty-four hours of drying per millimeter of plaster thickness. In the solvent phase, the wax only applies on a perfectly dry surface. Brush the plaster wall carefully first to remove the few loose grains of sand. To do this, use a semi-hard nylon brush or quack brush. Vacuum to remove the final dust.
After vigorously shaking the can, pour the wax into a clean plastic container. Very gelled, this thixotropic wax softens the brewing and applies without problem. But it is imperative to remix before each application. This can be done in several ways. Whichever you choose, never put it in a "bundle" on the wall to spread it out later, you'll only get uneven effects and darker spots. For the same reason, it is better to pass two thin layers rather than one thick one.
For very icy plasters, the stainless steel trowel works wonders. Paint with a brush a layer of wax on the flat of the tool. Starting at the bottom and giving the smoother the lowest possible angle, apply the wax on the support with a wide movement. The recovery always starts from an already waxed place. Fading with a large dry brush will equalize the layer. The application can also be performed with a brush, a soft cloth or a sheep skin glove. This last method has the advantage of a uniform deposit of wax on the wall, accompanied by an impressive time saving.
After a variable drying time of two to twenty-four hours depending on the thickness applied, apply a second coat. If the result is satisfactory from the first pass, gloss the wax with a sheepskin glove or a soft brush. The solvent gives off a lingering odor for several days. Also always work open windows, and ventilate the room as long as possible.

Bridging the defects of the wall

Bridging the defects of the wall

The most striking wall defects - here the traces of an old chimney - are filled with plaster or plaster. The main thing is to fill in the important gaps to save the coating.

Apply the primer

Apply the primer

For good performance, it is important to apply the primer evenly over the entire surface. Including on old paintings, previously ginned with coarse abrasive.

Prepare the plaster

Prepare the plaster

Ready to spoil, the tinted plaster pours into the water that has been agitated with the mixer mounted on drill. Add some until you get a fluid paste that just sticks a little to the trowel (new!).

Coat the panel

Coat the panel

Start by coating the periphery of the panel to be covered: vertical angles, skirting boards and ceiling edges. Be careful not to overflow if, as here, the other walls must remain neutral.

Apply the plaster

Apply the plaster

Apply the stained plaster, with a trowel or stainless steel trowel, heavily, pressing strongly on the blade to adhere the coating on the support. Equalize it roughly.

Smooth

Smooth

For the desired effect, a simple smoothing is enough. Print a wide circular motion with the tool, without worrying about slight burrs and irregularities that will be smoothed out later.

Protect switches and sockets

Protect switches and sockets

Duly disconnected from the mains by lowering the circuit-breaker concerned, the switches and sockets must be protected. Wrap them with newspaper wrapped in tape.

Brush the surface

Brush the surface

Wait several days before applying the finishing wax. Start with a thorough brushing of the surface, to remove loose sand grains and dust.

Brew the wax

Brew the wax

Very pasty, the wax requires to be vigorously shaken to drain the can. Pour a sufficient amount into a clean bowl and stir with a paint mixer to thin it.

Apply wax

Apply wax

Tilt the platter a little and apply the wax on the plaster. Repeats are made on the already spread to avoid irregularities. Work in large movements, in the opposite direction to plaster.

Fade overloads

Fade overloads

It is best to regularly reduce wax overload to reduce stains. A big used but clean brush, held firmly like a whitewashing brush, does the job perfectly.

Spread the wax to the glove

Spread the wax to the glove

Sheepskin glove is great for spreading wax evenly on raised surfaces. Do not load it inconsiderately and work with large, turning movements.

Apply a second layer of wax

Apply a second layer of wax

A second layer of wax is sometimes necessary. Wait twenty-four hours and, still with the glove, standardize the hue avoiding areas already very saturated.

polish

polish

Finally, polish the wax with a stiffer sheepskin (here a cabinetmaker's glove). Do not hesitate to rub strongly to warm the wax and soften it to better work.


Video Instruction: Teaching instructions for Stucco textures finishes and or patterns