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Designing and fitting a hood is a game of patience. Jean-Claude Carcy did not want a hood straight, too classic. To design the desired model, he took over the techniques used for boats

Cooker hood

A simple jigsaw is used to cut, in the fir board, the nine pieces constituting the frame. The tracing is carried out using two cardboard templates: one for the "pairs" wall and intermediate, the other for the two pairs of angle. The framework is formed at the workshop by gluing-screwing its elements between two frames (of the same wood) to hold them in position. The set then takes the form of an inverted boat hull.

Structure of the hood

A kitchen hood

The dressing of the hood

The cladding of the hood is a little complicated because of its particular profile, which requires machining one by one the oak slats to adjust them to the curve. In addition, as our reader did not want angle rods, their ends are mitered, which implies high assembly accuracy. The slats are here just glued in sets of three and held together by clamps. But nothing prevents to point them to simplify the work, then to coat the heads of the points. These small fillings will disappear under the whitewashed finish.

The frame of the hood

The frame of the hood

The couples forming the frame of the hood are caught between two frames of the same essence, to which they are glued and screwed. This "skeleton" will be dressed with limed oak slats.

Mold the crows

Mold the crows

The molds for crows are made of chipboard walls, closed in front by a sheet of plexiglass screwed every 15 mm to marry the profile. For the cornice, curved more narrow, the molded face is delimited by thin slats arranged edge to edge. A plastic sheet attached inside will provide a smooth surface during casting.

Seal the crows

Seal the crows

The crows are sealed in the wall with the hood in place, in order to adjust their height and spacing as accurately as possible. This also requires installing the extractor on its support plate (previously hollowed out in the center) and boards completed with a cardboard cut that reproduce the size of the cornice to come. The hood is only partially dressed to let the straps through the structure.

Fix the hood

Fix the hood

The hood is deposited to finish and ceruse its dressing. It is then reassembled and maintained by two metal cables (ø 6 mm) hung on a plank, itself attached to the joists of the attics lost. The cornice is then assembled in situ with plaster tile glue.

White lead

The white lead

White titanium or zinc replaces lead carbonate, formerly used as a white pigment and now banned for sale. Before application, the wood is prepared by digging it with a brass brush. A good dusting is necessary then. The white lead is brushed in the direction of the fibers and on small surfaces: 20 to 30 cm. The excess is removed in the wake with a clean and lint-free cloth: the hands remain gloved throughout the work. Dirt is cleaned with a cloth soaked in acetone. Although this is recommended, our reader did not wish to sand the white lead after application. He preferred, for aesthetic reasons, to oil the surfaces immediately with a Scandinavian oil: "One thus gets in finish a greasy film which reinforces the natural beauty."


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