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Spruce, larch, pine, fir: System D helps you recognize the peculiarities of softwoods to use them best in your DIY projects.

Spruce

Spruce

Its heartwood is not distinct from the sapwood. The wood is a very pale yellowish white with an orange veining. His thread is very straight and the grain fine and regular. The knots are quite hard and sometimes not very adherent.
All types of glue are suitable.

Availability

Very good

Price

Cheap

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Poor

Insect resistance

Poor


Job class

• Without treatment:

Not recommended

• With treatment:

I - II

Parquet floor

AT

use

Carpentry / structure, plywood, interior carpentry, paneling, molding

Larch

Larch

It has a yellowish-white sapwood and a heartwood that goes from pink to reddish-brown. Nodes are quite hard, sometimes not very adherent.
For bonding, an alkaline, solvent or resorcinol adhesive is preferably used (on freshly planed or sanded surfaces).

Availability

Very good

Price

Expensive

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Good

Insect resistance

Good


Job class

• Without treatment:

I - II - III

• With treatment:

I - II - III

Parquet floor

B

use

Shipbuilding, exterior carpentry, cladding, interior carpentry, parquet, paneling, molding

Oregon Pine - Douglas

Oregon Pine - Douglas

Its heartwood is reddish brown more or less pronounced. Its sapwood is pale and is distinguished from the perfect wood. It is a straight grain wood with a medium to coarse grain.
Its bonding can be easily achieved with all types of glue.

Availability

Very good

Price

Expensive

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Very good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Good

Insect resistance

Good


Job class

• Without treatment:

I - II - III

• With treatment:

I - II - III

Parquet floor

AT

use

Exterior joinery, cladding, carpentry / structure, interior carpentry

Maritime pine

Maritime pine

Its sapwood is very broad, yellow-white in color, and its reddish to light brown heartwood, veined and striated with large resinous canals. The thread is straight and the irregular grain is coarse. Nodes are quite hard, sometimes not very adherent.
Its bonding is easy, except in case of significant resin content (then use an alkaline or resorcinol adhesive).

Availability

Very good

Price

Cheap

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Good

Insect resistance

Good


Job class

• Without treatment:

I - II - III

• With treatment:

I - II - III - IV

Parquet floor

B

use

Exterior carpentry, cladding, framework / structure (glulam), interior carpentry, parquet, paneling, molding, furniture, plywood

New Year pine

New Year pine

It has a broad sapwood of yellowish white hue and a heartwood ranging from pink to reddish brown. His thread is usually straight and his grain rather coarse. The hard knots are sometimes not very adherent.
All types of glue are suitable for gluing (if the wood is very resinous, use an alkaline or resorcinol glue).

Availability

Very good

Price

Cheap

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Good

Insect resistance

Good


Job class

• Without treatment:

I - II - III

• With treatment:

I - II - III-IV

Parquet floor

AT

use

Exterior carpentry, cladding, carpentry / structure, interior carpentry, parquet, molding, furniture

Fir

Fir

Its heartwood is not distinct from the sapwood. The wood goes from dull white to pale pink. The thread is straight and regular.
Its collage is very easy, with all types of glue.

Availability

Very good

Price

Cheap

Hardness

Poor

Dimensional stability

Very good

Adaptation to ambient humidity

Very good

Mushroom resistance

Poor

Insect resistance

Poor


Job class

• Without treatment:

Not recommended

• With treatment:

I - II

Parquet floor

AT


Video Instruction: How to Identify Hardwoods and Softwoods